Saturday, May 1, 2010

I ate Dandelions for Dinner

I didn't like them.  Here's the recipe I tried:

Dandelion Greens Saute

1 lb. dandelion greens
3 tablespoons olive oil
5 cloves garlic
1/4 cup sesame seeds, toasted
1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil

Wash and slice greens. Blanch in enough water to cover about 1 minute. Drain and saute in the olive oil for 3-4 minutes, then add the sesame and garlic and saute for couple minutes more. Add the sesame oil and serve.

I think it may have been to olive oil - it was one of those flavored ones (Basil flavored).  But the dish just tasted yucky.  Too many different flavors perhaps.

If I can get another bunch of dandelion greens from Maya again this week, I am going to try the one with bacon!  Everything tastes great with bacon!  :)


Happy Digging (Eating?)
The Garren Goddess
http://www.down2earthgardens.com/

2 comments:

Joseph said...

I tried dandelions a couple of times. Unfortunately, they are extremely bitter for my tastes. Most sources will tell you to soak them in salt water, boil them twice in water (replacing the water between boilings), or soak them in apple cider vinegar or lemon juice. I only tried plain water soaking, dumping the water between soaks. It was still too bitter. Perhaps that's what you were tasting. But HEY, I commend you for trying them!

Edie.Frederick said...

A friend sent me your website today because of our mutual interests in deep permaculture. You are a much needed true practitioner! I will email -- from the mountains of Idaho. Re dandylions, they can provide bitters to a health diet, which is one of the hardest ingredients to find. Take a look at a classic book, Health From God's Garden, by Maria Treben, an Austrian herbalist -- there are millions in print. She recommends eating ~ 10 organic dandylion stems raw every day you can. :-) I can do that. :-) I have always wanted to try roasting dandylion root as a chicory-type alternative for coffee. Maybe this year. One of the old-timers here told me his mother always put a bushel basket over the emerging spring dandylions to blanch them & make them more palatable. But i failed to get eating tips! My Appaloosa horse grew up in these mountains & had a lot of favorite herbs, including dandylions & a hard little reed that must have contained silicone. I rode him in a hackamore, no bit in his mouth & he was always scanning the landscape -- would speed up for his favorites, like the huge grasses that were wild oats to him.

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